Lame Reader

So, Atticus and I have determined to try and wake up at 5:30 every morning to go to the gym.  Today would be the third week anniversary of our ambitious new schedule and so far we haven’t dropped dead.  It’s actually been kind of nice (once we’re awake and actually at the gym).  The only trouble has been that we hit the wall called exhaustion at 8pm every single night.  I don’t think we’ve gone to bed after 9pm since September.

Aaaaanyway, what I’m really saying is that falling asleep that early has cut in on my usual book-devouring time, so I haven’t put up my usual numbers.  But I have been able to read a few since my last post:

The Subtle Knife by Philip Pullman:  Actually, I was listening to this one rather than reading.  It’s been good to revisit His Dark Materials again.  I still think, though, that this middle volume is Pullman’s weakest, but necessary to set up The Amber Spyglass, which is my favorite of the trilogy.

Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins.  Yes, the final installment in The Hunger Games trilogy!  I don’t know if I’ll be flayed for saying this, but the first one, in my opinion, was the best one.  But I’m glad I got some sort of closure–Katniss totally ended up with the right dude.  But I had this thought:  “I know people who have conniption fits over one tasteful sex scene or a couple of curse words in books (which are actually very, very good books), yet they’re totally okay with the violence and gore in this series…because the books don’t have swearing or sex…?  Makes absolutely no sense to me.”    I don’t know if I’ll ever understand that one.

The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan:  I read In Defense of Food in Boston and really loved it, so I figured it was about time I read this other famous Pollan book.  Now I have trouble saying the word “corn” without feeling a little ill, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing…in the ethical long run…I hope.

Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner:  Fascinating fascinating.  Good choice, my non-fiction book group people!  And guess what?  They’re making a Freakonomics movie!

In a Sunburned Country by Bill Bryson:  I’ve been a Bryson fan since I ran across his Short History of Nearly Everything in London.  But, until The Danosaur notified me, I had no idea that Bryson wrote travel memoirs.  She recommended this one, detailing his travels through Australia.  It was awesome, hilarious, and full of fascinating facts like the disappearances of Prime Ministers, giant worms, and the particular strangeness of the inhabitants of Queensland (“Crazy as a bag of snakes.”).  Highly recommended for anyone who doesn’t know much about Australia…which should be everyone, including Australians apparently.

Still Reading

Harry Potter, Year 5 by J.K. Rowling:  Seeing as we’re only 35 days away from the beginning of the end of the Harry Potter generation, I had to start re-reading the last three HP bibles.

The Amber Spyglass by Philip Pullman:  Because you can’t start re-reading a trilogy and not finish it!  Especially when the final section of this final book is the best part of the whole saga.

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6 Comments

Filed under Hobbies and Such

6 responses to “Lame Reader

  1. Petra

    Good choices, all of those. I read In a Sunburned Country in high school and have been terrified of Australia ever since. Oh, and Notes From a Small Island is my favorite Bryson travel memoir.

  2. Petra

    By the way, you get to be “lame” at whatever else you want if you’re getting up at 5:30 to go to the gym. I am totally impressed.

  3. danosaur

    1. For me at least, sex scenes and the really foul language tend to linger longer after I read, leaving a bad taste. Not that I appreciated or even was “okay with” the violence and gore the Hunger Games, but it doesn’t seem to have the same long-lasting effect or imprint on the mind.

    2. Freakonomics = Awesome. Superfreakonomics = lame sequel.

    3. The only other travel memoir (kind of) of Bryson’s that I’ve read is A Walk in the Woods. Also highly recommended.

  4. danosaur

    *in the Hunger Games…

  5. I recently read Mockingjay too, and I wholeheartedly agree about all the gore. I don’t remember reading such gory books when I was younger! I don’t even think I would have been allowed to read Twilight when I was in high school. ::Gasp::

  6. Pinto

    “For me at least, sex scenes and the really foul language tend to linger longer after I read, leaving a bad taste. Not that I appreciated or even was “okay with” the violence and gore the Hunger Games, but it doesn’t seem to have the same long-lasting effect or imprint on the mind.”

    Yeah, so, here’s my point—WHY is it that way? I don’t know about you, but I’m thinking that the image of blowing up little children should stick around a bit longer in our brains and have a longer-lasting effect than someone writing four letters on a page… I think I’m just generally disturbed at our American brains.

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